Cava: aka Catalan Champagne

Amongst the many things Barcelona has going for it, is the bubbly little local beverage known as Cava – aka ‘Catalan Champagne’. Like some of you no doubt, I first encountered the drink in pseudo-upmarket bars in London, where annoying city workers in suits would order it for 30 quid a bottle as a kind of poor man’s champers with which to impress their female colleagues. (Or vice versa, as was sometimes the case with me). But these days, rather than feign interest in my line manager for the sake of free flute, I like to drink it much closer to the source at prices I can afford myself.

Here in BCN you can buy a bottle of Cava in your local supermarket for as little as one euro a pop, and even a bottle made by the renowned Freixenet or Codorniu wineries (the latter is credited with creating the first ever Cavas, after nipping across the border to make some notes on the production methods of French Champagne!) costs just 5 or 6 euros from Consum.

Aside from the supermercado, naturally you can get a bottle in pretty much ever bar and restaurant in town, however undoubtedly the most authentic way to drink Cava in Barcelona is in one of the city’s cult Xampanyerias. There are two that stand out. The first is the legendary Can Paixano, often referred to as La Xampanyeria. It’s a classic spit and sawdust place in Barceloneta district, that opens at 9am and stays open until around 10pm (warning: closed on Sundays). As such it’s the scene of many a daytime drinking session, especially as the place has (deservedly) made it’s way into pretty much every guidebook going. Order up delicious bocadillos (Freak recommends the Krakowski!) for around 2 euros each and glasses of Cava starting at 85 cents. The only downers are the miserable @sshole at the door, and the fact that from around 6 or 7pm it’s so packed that there’s not even enough room to raise your glass. (www.canpaixano.com).

The second is a bit more of civilised affair. El Xampanyet doesn’t open until 7pm and also closes early at 11 or so, but thankfully it doesn’t get quite as crowded as Can Paixano. With a bit of luck you can often grab a seat in this beautiful Modernista-style tapas bar, and whilst the prices are slightly higher than C.P. they’re still dirt cheap by international standards… just check the prices as they do seem to inflate the prices a bit for those who like like tourists! Anyway you can read a review of El Xampanyet in Barcelona’s Born district here.

Those of you with a bit more time might want to go and sample some Cava at the source… ie. the Penedes region of Catalonia. Granted, it’s not quite as famous as La Rioja, but it’s one of Spain’s foremost wine-making zones and you may want to check out my former post about wine tasting day trips from Barcelona to see what your options are. Many wineries are accessible by train from BCN (hint: they’re also a great place to hold a Calcotada!). Apart from the usual vineyard tours, as our amigos at Barcelona Life point out, you can also do bike tours with wine tasting, plus in recent months I found out about a so-called “create your own Cava experience“, which I hope to bring you a full post about in due course.

Or if you want to check out what an expert mixologist can do with a good bottle of Cava and a few secret ingredients then go back to my post about Barcelona’s innovative new cocktail bars!

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2 responses to “Cava: aka Catalan Champagne

  1. Have you been to Sant Sadurni d’Anoia? Apparently you can do tours for 5€ followed by cava tasting, I’ve been meaning to check it out for a while.

  2. barcelonafr3k

    Yes I’ve been there! (Check out my Calcotada post;) Nice little town! I’m guessing the tour you’re talking about takes place at the Freixenet winery. I must confess I haven’t been inside, but it’s a wonderful Modernista style building. You can take the train from Sants Station and takes about 35 mins to get there (the winery is right by the station!). Thanks for your comment!

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